Monthly Archives: November 2016

29th November 2016

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This charming advert (why be worried about your buttons) marks the earliest printed evidence of what was to become a major Australian manufacturing success story.  Berthold Herrman would establish a metal stamping, electroplating and button moulding company that was the start of what would become General Plastics,  the manufacturers of Beauclaire buttons.  I have updated the General Plastics page to tell the story. Do check it out!

28th November 2016

A few weeks ago I talked about the Landico button manufacturing firm. A reader has shared photos of a Landico button in her collection.  I’m envious, but grateful for the pics. Thanks, Jean!

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I have received a beautiful card of Roger Berry buttons. Enjoy!

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26th November 2016

Thanks to Mick Thompson I’ve been introduced to another proud tailoring firm.

Goulburn Evening Penny Post 21st October 1930

Goulburn Evening Penny Post 21st October 1930

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Mick has shared a picture of a Bladwell button dug up Bowning,  NSW,  that,  according to the above,  must date from 1880-1950  (the business was still being run by family members in 1950;   I don’t know when it closed).

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Across the Tasman now:  In Wellington the name of van Staveren was well known.  Herman van Steveren (1849-1930) was the Rabbi of Wellington from 1877 until his death.  He was very active in the community,  serving on charitable and hospital boards, for example.   Three of his sons (out of 13 children) opened Van Staveren Bros. Limited in 1905 as general traders and importers.  The firm finally closed in the 1980’s.

The Art Deco style Van Staveren Building, built 1937.

The Art Deco style Van Staveren Building, built 1937.

Rabbi Herman van Staveren, wife Miriam with children and grandchildren c.1925

Rabbi Herman van Staveren, wife Miriam with children and grandchildren c.1925

Whilst they were merchants rather than tailors,  they must have been involved in the production of  buttons (at least) for soldiers’ uniforms.  See below for a picture of an uniform button (?WW1 or2) repurposed as a badge with the backmark ‘VAN STAVEREN, WELLINGTON’.  As 4 sons volunteered in WW1,  the family was obviously proud to contribute.

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25th November 2016

It seems good design can outlast fashion,  as with the vintage duck and fish buttons previously discussed that are still being made after 6o plus years.  I just purchased some buttons from the 1980’s that are Beauclaire designs from the 1950’s.  The colours are different,  but the designs unchanged.

80's version of carded 50's designs.

80’s version of carded 50’s designs.

Below are some new cards.  It’s nice to have another Demetre card,  as they don’t appear for sale often.  The partial caards are Beutron brand.

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23rd November 2016

We’ve just had a relaxing couple of days away, staying at Marysville.  On the way back, in Yea,  I acquired this circa 1970 Plaistowe tin.  It will make a nice container for my kookaburra buttons!

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Hugh Plaistowe (1870 – 1935) was born in London and worked in his father’s confectionery business.  Around 1895 he came to Perth and continued in this trade in partnership with Mr J. Hobbs.  A new factory was opened in 1915 and by 1930 was producing over 400 types of chocolates, lollies, cocoa, icing sugar and fruit peel.  The company was bought by Nestle in 1990.

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These pictures are from The Daily Mail and the Western Mail scanned into Trove.

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18th November 2016

Buttonmania is having a final  sale (so get there tomorrow or else) before Kate hands over the reins to new owners who will run it from a new location.  It was my last chance to visit the beautiful Cathederal Arcade in the Nicholas Building, Swanston Street,  and go crazy for Australian buttons.

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With 20% off I didn’t hold back……

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Wow! I want some of those fancy handkerchiefs for 2 shillings each!

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And speaking of arcades,  there was some hand-writing on one of the Maxart boxes that intrigued me:

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Looking up the Royal Arcade’s web page made me smile.  Do you see what I saw?

Gog and Magog in the Royal Arcade (photographer and date unknown).

Gog and Magog in the Royal Arcade (photographer and date unknown).

16th November 2016

Continuing my series on teenagers in the media:

From the Australian Women’s Weekly 5th June 1968: …”why not acquire the dog likely to appeal to your type of man?  Pick the right clothes, too.”

"The country boy. He loves picnic races, cattle shows, country walks, and log fires. His dogs, a brace of bull mastiffs.

“The country boy.  He loves picnic races, cattle shows, country walks, and log fires.  His dogs, a brace of bull mastiffs.”

The sophisticated by. He likes nightclubs, sports cars, good winw, and jet travel. His dog is an aristocratic borzoi."

“The sophisticated by.  He likes nightclubs, sports cars, good winw, and jet travel.  His dog is an aristocratic borzoi.”

The sportsman. He likes football, skiing, barbecues, and slapstick comedy. His dog is the fun loving bulldog".

The sportsman.  He likes football, skiing, barbecues, and slapstick comedy.  His dog is the fun loving bulldog”.